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We try to think about creative ways to display what’s happening in the world. So here’s our Wall Street Journal Word Cloud, taking the most relevant words from today’s online version.

What’s the most relevant word? Crisis. (No surprise, huh? Go figure.)

For more, go here.

This is one of our favorite interviews! Media personality Mo Reilley gives her thoughts on the radio industry and adapting to the changes that it presents. This is a “must watch” interview for anyone interested in how to thrive in the ups and downs of such a dynamic business. Want more? Go Here.


The Rise of the Cheating Economy:


At Ashley Madison’s website for “dating,” the infidelity economy is alive, well, and profitable.

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The Rise of the Cheating Economy:

At Ashley Madison’s website for “dating,” the infidelity economy is alive, well, and profitable.

MORE

Did you miss any of our audio exclusives this week? No worries! You can catch up here!

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In this episode, we discuss the Google Art Project, “Rediscovering the Power of No”, and reactions from cartoonists to the AOL/HuffPo deal, and music from Adele.

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The G Cafe

In this audio exclusive from The G Cafe, Floyd Hall talks with Irina Avtsin about her new book, Rediscovering the Power of No.

The leadership of women in politics, business, and society is becoming evident across the globe. Growing numbers of women are becoming political leaders, the most recent being Dilma Rouseff, who took over as Brazil’s first woman president. She follows in the footsteps of other female politicians such as Chile’s Michelle Bachelet, Argentina’s Cristina Kirchner, and Germany’s Angela Merkel. Last year, India even reserved a third of the seats in its legislature for women.

Women are also rising to the forefront in other parts of government. In November 2010, for instance, several women played key roles during U.S. President Barack Obama’s visit to India. The ones in the spotlight were of course Michelle Obama and Sonia Gandhi. In addition, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton helped shape Indo-U.S. ties, as did a troika of Indian women bureaucrats: Foreign Secretary Nirupama Rao; India’s U.S. Ambassador Meera Shankar; and Joint Secretary (Americas) Gaitri Kumar.

Read more.

We are in the midst of a communications revolution that has affected the media industry from a financial, operational, technological, and content perspective; a revolution that has profoundly changed the way individuals and institutions in the media interact among each other and with society in general.

Disruption is bound to happen in any established industry, but those with the ability to adapt quickly and intelligently will be able to take advantage of that disruption and formulate new models that will blend the past and present ways of thinking and ultimately become the new standards. The difference between the media industry and many others is the relative speed with which this disruption is happening, and the relative slowness that some outlets have demonstrated in trying to keep up with the changes.

One of the most difficult aspects in coping with the new changes in the media industry is related to how to consistently assign and derive value from each aspect of a business’ operations and customer base—especially when the makeup of that customer base can change rapidly in the face of new competition. However, dealing with that and other challenges is what still makes the media industry so attractive and compelling from a strategy perspective.

The internet has broken down communication barriers around the world, creating a more level playing field due to the democratization of media technology tools which has led to more new entrants, thereby fostering increased global competition for content and innovative applications. In light of these developments, from a business perspective, there are still opportunities to create value if companies are willing to rethink how they allocate resources, change how they manage their workforce and customer relationships, and be flexible in sourcing and distributing their content.

Thus, considering the political, cultural, and financial aspects of the media industry in our society, it is an industry that remains relevant because there are still stories that need to be told and voices that need to be heard. The major challenge is figuring out how to continually reconstruct and update the bridge between these great stories, voices, and ideas and the audience that wants to hear them.

This post gives some advice on how to bring your business to a global audience.