1. nycedc:

Our new Take the HELM competition rewards and promotes new Lower Manhattan tenants that can bring the best and brightest employees to the neighborhood, with the potential to add more in the near future; continue the re-branding of Lower Manhattan as a hub of innovative businesses poised for growth; and diversify the economic base of this 85-million square foot central business district, complementing the financial sector.
To encourage business growth in Lower Manhattan, Take the HELM is looking to award four $250,000 cash grants to the following types of companies:
Creative: If you’re a creative company, Take the HELM wants to reward you for joining Condé Nast, SHoP Architects, The Paris Review, and XO Group in Lower Manhattan. 
Tech: If you’re a technology company, Take the HELM wants to welcome you to a neighborhood that has nearly doubled its tech presence in the last five years.
New New Yorkers: If you’re a company from outside New York City, Take the HELM will help you establish roots in Lower Manhattan and continue the neighborhood’s appeal to the world’s best and brightest.
Startups: If you’re a startup less than three years old, Take the HELM will help you build an office and connect you with the neighborhood’s burgeoning startup community.  
Take the HELM will select up to 20 finalists that best meet the goals of the competition and seek to open an office in Lower Manhattan. Finalists will each receive a $10,000 cash grant and an opportunity to interview with the distinguished Selection Committee, and will participate in two days of exclusive business development programs in Lower Manhattan. Up to four Take the HELM winners will receive an additional $250,000. At least one $250,000 prize will be reserved for startup applicants.
Interested? Find out more at www.taketheHELMnyc.com. Applications are due November 30, 2012.

    nycedc:

    Our new Take the HELM competition rewards and promotes new Lower Manhattan tenants that can bring the best and brightest employees to the neighborhood, with the potential to add more in the near future; continue the re-branding of Lower Manhattan as a hub of innovative businesses poised for growth; and diversify the economic base of this 85-million square foot central business district, complementing the financial sector.

    To encourage business growth in Lower Manhattan, Take the HELM is looking to award four $250,000 cash grants to the following types of companies:

    • Creative: If you’re a creative company, Take the HELM wants to reward you for joining Condé Nast, SHoP Architects, The Paris Review, and XO Group in Lower Manhattan. 
    • Tech: If you’re a technology company, Take the HELM wants to welcome you to a neighborhood that has nearly doubled its tech presence in the last five years.
    • New New Yorkers: If you’re a company from outside New York City, Take the HELM will help you establish roots in Lower Manhattan and continue the neighborhood’s appeal to the world’s best and brightest.
    • Startups: If you’re a startup less than three years old, Take the HELM will help you build an office and connect you with the neighborhood’s burgeoning startup community.  

    Take the HELM will select up to 20 finalists that best meet the goals of the competition and seek to open an office in Lower Manhattan. Finalists will each receive a $10,000 cash grant and an opportunity to interview with the distinguished Selection Committee, and will participate in two days of exclusive business development programs in Lower Manhattan. Up to four Take the HELM winners will receive an additional $250,000. At least one $250,000 prize will be reserved for startup applicants.

    Interested? Find out more at www.taketheHELMnyc.com. Applications are due November 30, 2012.

  2. Latino unemployment rate rises while overall rate falls


    The overall unemployment rate fell to 9 percent, but the Latino unemployment rate went up to 11.4 percent. (Getty Images)

    By: JORDAN FABIAN
    Channel: Politics

    The unemployment rate in the U.S. fell to 9 percent in October but the economy only added 80,000 jobs, according to a Bureau of Labor Statistics report released Friday.

    Despite that positive movement, the unemployment rate for Latinos ticked upwards to 11.4 percent.

    The October job-creation numbers were less than expected; economists predicted job growth to top 100,000. Still, the report contained some good news. The number of jobs created in September was revised upward from 103,000 to 158,000 and the August number was actually 104,000, instead of the projected 57,000.

    And the amount of long-term unemployed, those without a job for 27 weeks or longer, fell by 366,000 in October to 5.9 million, or 42.4 percent of the total amount of unemployed.

    The uptick in Latino unemployment could have been driven by mixed results in sectors that employ large amounts of Latinos.  Read More

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  3. theeconomist:
Protestors in Greece demonstrate against austerity measures. George Papandreou, Greece’s prime minister, chose the wrong time to call for a referendum on the latest deal to salvage the euro. His last gamble may have hastened his demise.

    theeconomist:

    Protestors in Greece demonstrate against austerity measures. George Papandreou, Greece’s prime minister, chose the wrong time to call for a referendum on the latest deal to salvage the euro. His last gamble may have hastened his demise.

  4. We’ve been seeing Tom Friedman in promo mode lately for this new book. On the surface it seems to be a rehashing of his “look at what history has shown us” mantra that lots of pundits agree with, yet which always seem more theoretical than practical given all the forces influencing the country’s decision-makers. Hopefully it’s an interesting read that gets people talking…
thesmithian:


…they offer a range of examples of how America can do better  than it has done in the recent past. Despite its slightly misleading  subtitle, “That Used to Be Us” is not really a “how to” book, not really  a policy book. Friedman and Mandelbaum go very light on the  programmatic details. Instead, they emphasize the power of good  examples…

more.

    We’ve been seeing Tom Friedman in promo mode lately for this new book. On the surface it seems to be a rehashing of his “look at what history has shown us” mantra that lots of pundits agree with, yet which always seem more theoretical than practical given all the forces influencing the country’s decision-makers. Hopefully it’s an interesting read that gets people talking…

    thesmithian:

    …they offer a range of examples of how America can do better than it has done in the recent past. Despite its slightly misleading subtitle, “That Used to Be Us” is not really a “how to” book, not really a policy book. Friedman and Mandelbaum go very light on the programmatic details. Instead, they emphasize the power of good examples…

    more.

  5. President Barack Obama recently unveiled the American Jobs Act, aimed at rejuvenating the U.S. economy. Watch, Listen, and judge for yourself.

    More here.

  6. Daily chart: which economies have fared best and worst during the global financial crisis? 

    Daily chart: which economies have fared best and worst during the global financial crisis? 

  7. Wall Street Journal: "California Prison Academy: Better Than a Harvard Degree" →

    latimes:

    Prison guards can retire at the age of 55 and earn 85% of their final year’s salary for the rest of their lives. They also continue to receive medical benefits.

    reblogged via markcoatney (with longer discussion on his blog)

  8. The Economist Women’s Economic Opportunity Index

    In hopes of going beyond the traditional PowerPoint presentation, The Economist tapped JESS3 to help bring an important data set to life through a powerful graphic animation.

    (Source: vimeo.com)

  9. A who’s who at Davos: The World Economic Forum’s summit in Davos is  traditionally dominated by attendees from rich western countries, but in  recent years increasing numbers of delegates have travelled from India  and China.

    A who’s who at Davos: The World Economic Forum’s summit in Davos is traditionally dominated by attendees from rich western countries, but in recent years increasing numbers of delegates have travelled from India and China.